lazysmirk:


Lale Labuko witnessed the unspeakable and spoke out. At age 15, he saw elders from his tribe in southwestern Ethiopia tear a two-year-old girl from her mother’s arms and run away with her. The child was never seen again. 
On that day, he heard the word mingi for the first time—a term to describe a cursed baby or child. Ancient belief says children who are deemed mingi will bring drought, famine, and disease to the tribe if they are allowed to live. Ritualistic killing is traditionally seen as the only solution.
 “I was crying and so shocked. I wanted to save that little girl.” 
The killings are kept secret from anyone younger than 15. In fact, Labuko later learned he had two older sisters, both mingi, who were killed before he ever knew them.
When did you find out about this practice?
I was around 15. A village elder grabbed a two-year-old from the mother, and the mother was crying. I was not sure what was going on. My mother said, “Lale, some children in the tribe are declared mingi,and they kill them.” She said mingi means “cursed.”
How are the children killed?
Sometimes they’re left in the bush, no water, no nothing. Or they’re pushed off a cliff.
When did you first try to take action?
In 2008 I said to the elders, you think these children are cursed and bring disease and famine. Could you give me a child? Maybe the curse will follow me. Some elders agreed: “Let’s try and see.”
How big a risk was this?
Others warned me: “You rescue the children, one day [the tribe is] going to kill you.”
Clearly you didn’t listen.
Yes. And my tribe [the Kara] has stopped [the practice] completely. But the Hamer tribe still practices it. It’s hard to change an ancient culture.
Do you tell the children you’ve rescued about the fate they escaped?
They are too young. I tell them, “You are here for school.” When they are older, I will explain, “This is a custom. It’s not your parents’ fault. It was good I rescued you guys.” This year I got an email from National Geographic recognizing me as an “emerging explorer.” These children, one day, they will be the next emerging explorers. X

For more info, including where to donate, see XX

lazysmirk:

Lale Labuko witnessed the unspeakable and spoke out. At age 15, he saw elders from his tribe in southwestern Ethiopia tear a two-year-old girl from her mother’s arms and run away with her. The child was never seen again.

On that day, he heard the word mingi for the first time—a term to describe a cursed baby or child. Ancient belief says children who are deemed mingi will bring drought, famine, and disease to the tribe if they are allowed to live. Ritualistic killing is traditionally seen as the only solution.

“I was crying and so shocked. I wanted to save that little girl.”

The killings are kept secret from anyone younger than 15. In fact, Labuko later learned he had two older sisters, both mingi, who were killed before he ever knew them.

When did you find out about this practice?

I was around 15. A village elder grabbed a two-year-old from the mother, and the mother was crying. I was not sure what was going on. My mother said, “Lale, some children in the tribe are declared mingi,and they kill them.” She said mingi means “cursed.”

How are the children killed?

Sometimes they’re left in the bush, no water, no nothing. Or they’re pushed off a cliff.

When did you first try to take action?

In 2008 I said to the elders, you think these children are cursed and bring disease and famine. Could you give me a child? Maybe the curse will follow me. Some elders agreed: “Let’s try and see.”

How big a risk was this?

Others warned me: “You rescue the children, one day [the tribe is] going to kill you.”

Clearly you didn’t listen.

Yes. And my tribe [the Kara] has stopped [the practice] completely. But the Hamer tribe still practices it. It’s hard to change an ancient culture.

Do you tell the children you’ve rescued about the fate they escaped?

They are too young. I tell them, “You are here for school.” When they are older, I will explain, “This is a custom. It’s not your parents’ fault. It was good I rescued you guys.” This year I got an email from National Geographic recognizing me as an “emerging explorer.” These children, one day, they will be the next emerging explorers. X

For more info, including where to donate, see XX

bonnie bennett + favorite quote

Problem (feat. Angel Haze) [Willy Moon Remix]

(Source: nataliaxkills)

39355 listens

i’ve got you.
so you have.
xx

milady de winter - 1x10

(Source: pia-douwes)

thestraggletag:

zionangel:

She once treated a poor thief far better than I deserved.

She does that a lot.

THANK YOU FOR ACKNOWLEDGING THIS JFC I WOULD HAVE BEEN SO MAD IF HE COMPLETELY IGNORED HER.

How sad is it that we’re all so happy this happened?

(Source: wondertwinc)

my-gosh-its-snowing:

adrasteia16:

starzangelus:

tacobellefrench:

iheartheworldcalling:

tacobellefrench:

my-gosh-its-snowing:

Can you imagine Snow when she sees she’s pregnant after she hasn’t remembered a year of her life
“Well gosh darn look at that”

image

image

Don’t you mean im-pregnated?

she was definitely impaled by something

image

I’m sorry guys I had to.

This text post is now canon you’re welcome

(Source: ginnnifergoodwin)

The kingdom of heaven is a dream, our only life is here.

valdezstilinski:

”Say it again.”

the reason Peter Capaldi deserves a Best Supporting Actor TV BAFTA

this is actually “one” of the reasons he deserves that anyway but in this scene, all of us, i mean LITERALLY all of us screamed, yelled, sick worried because The Cardinal was this close to die. yeah, he’s the villain, bad guy of the show but the show can not reach to the end like this. If The Cardinal needs to die to put an end to his existence in the show, it shouldn’t be like this. Not getting poisoned by some guest character(!). The Cardinal represents a glorious image, he’s an honourable man in his own way. So that he deserves a glorious, honourable death.

you had me going into a panic attack tonight Peter, but it was a good one. At least the reason was so perfect. It hurt too much, but it was a good hurt. A perfect piece of acting caused a lot of deep/strong emotions on one of your audience. I salute you man. I salute your talent and perfectness. God bless you.

Manhattan vs. New York City Serenade

(Source: oncegifs)

goshdallas:

My only thought during this scene.

(Source: leaveatrail)

annythecat:

Belle and Neal in 3x12 part 1

(Source: rumpelstltskin)

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